All posts by upperrideaulakeassoc

Jayne MacDonald’s reasons to plant trees. – #101 They are FREE!

maple trees on shoreline

Jayne is a director of the Rideau Lakes Environmental Foundation, Community Representative on the City of Kingston Environmental Advisory Forum (KEAF), and Past President of the Upper Rideau Lake Association (URLA). Follow her postings on the URLA Face book group See the reasons here.

 

Here is how to get your free trees next spring. Offer ends Dec. 7 2019

Select native “bare root” trees and shrubs will be available once again this spring, free to URLA members. Choose from the plants below to help form a natural lakeshore, and contribute to better lake water quality. Naturalized shorelines stop nutrients from leaching into our lake, help prevent soil erosion and can reduce the growth of algae and weeds in the lake.
Trees available this year include Black Willow (prefers “wet feet”/moist conditions), Bur Oak (moist/dry conditions), Chokecherry(moist to dry conditions), Eastern White Cedar (moist conditions), Eastern White Pine (moist/dry), Hard (Sugar) Maple (intermediate to dry conditions), Larch (wet/moist), Red Maple (wet/moist), Red Oak (moist/dry), Silver Maple (wet/intermediate), White Birch (moist/dry), and White Spruce (moist/intermediate).
Shrubs available include Black Elderberry (prefers wet/moist conditions), Gray Dogwood (moist/intermediate), Highbush Cranberry (wet to intermediate), Nannyberry (wet/moist), Pussy Willow (wet/moist), Red Osier Dogwood (wet to intermediate), Sandbar Willow (wet/moist), Sweet Gale (wet to intermediate), Alternate Leaf Dogwood (moist/intermediate), and Serviceberry (moist to dry conditions).
Note: All plants are bare-root and small compared to those purchased commercially. Bare root seedlings should be planted within a day or so of pickup, if at all possible.
Orders: Minimum orders per variety of both trees and shrubs are groups of 10 plants. Orders must be placed by Friday, December 7, 2018 by contacting John McDowell by email at lakeshore.urla@gmail.com, or by telephone at 613-722-5829. Please make sure to include your name, phone number, and email address, when submitting your order.

Connect with URLA

1. Visit our website

cropped-logo-urlaca-square-heron

2. Follow us on social media.

Instagram logoFollow URLA on Instagram 
Facebook logoFollow URLA on Facebook
BlueLogoPost to URLA Facebook group
twitter logoFollow URLA on twitter

 

3. Contact members of the board

Boad of directors at table

The executive is comprised of volunteers committed to executing the activities of the Association.

Executive Member Role Email
Christine Skirth President president@urla.ca
Jayne MacDonald Past President
Murray Kane Treasurer treasurer.urla@gmail.com
Terry Frostad Secretary secretary.urla@gmail.com
Dave Counter Water Quality waterquality.urla@gmail.com
John McDowell Lakeshore lakeshore.urla@gmail.com
David McKinney Public Relations publicrelations@urla.ca
Anne Carter Membership membership@urla.ca
Diana Kemp Community Affairs communityaffairs@urla.ca
Steve Moretti Members at Large memberatlarge.urla@gmail.com

4. Contact us now

We want your ideas and feedback to improve our community and our communications. Complete the information below and click “SUBMIT” to contact an executive member.

 

5. Contacted by post

Upper Rideau Lake Association
Box 67,
Westport, Ontario,
K0G 1X0

6. Join the URLA

7. Road representatives

We send News Letters by email four times a year and we email brief updates on off months in the summer. In addition we post regularly to the social media above.

Cormorants

Proposal to establish a hunting season for double-crested cormorants in Ontario

Environmental Registry of Ontario (ERO) Number:  013-4124

Comment period:  November 19, 2018 – January 3, 2019

FYI

The Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) is proposing to create a hunting season for double-crested cormorants in response to concerns that double-crested cormorants have been detrimental to fish stocks and natural habitats.  The proposed approach would allow persons who hold a small game licence to hunt these birds and provide a new tool for the management of double-crested cormorants.  The rules for hunting double-crested cormorants would be generally consistent with regulations related to migratory birds.

 

If a hunting season is created, MNRF will implement a monitoring program to further assess the status of double-crested cormorants in Ontario.

This proposal will be posted on the Environmental Registry (https://ero.ontario.ca/notice/013-4124) with comments accepted until January 3, 2019.

Proposal to establish a hunting season for double-crested cormorants in Ontario

Environmental Registry of Ontario (ERO) Number:  013-4124

Comment period:  November 19, 2018 – January 3, 2019

 

The Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) is proposing to create a hunting season for double-crested cormorants in response to concerns that double-crested cormorants have been detrimental to fish stocks and natural habitats.  The proposed approach would allow persons who hold a small game licence to hunt these birds and provide a new tool for the management of double-crested cormorants.  The rules for hunting double-crested cormorants would be generally consistent with regulations related to migratory birds.

 

If a hunting season is created, MNRF will implement a monitoring program to further assess the status of double-crested cormorants in Ontario.

This proposal will be posted on the Environmental Registry (https://ero.ontario.ca/notice/013-4124) with comments accepted until January 3, 2019.

 

Jack Cook

Jack Cook, the first president of the Upper Rideau Lake Association (URLA) passed away on Tuesday Nov. 20, 2018.  In 1990 Jack, together with Westport Mayor Bill Thake identified a zero-discharge solution to the problem with the village’s sewage treatment system which had been releasing effluent into the lake.  Under his leadership, the lake association grew and thrived and the health of our precious lake regenerated.  Jack and his wife Bea will be remembered as tireless advocates for Upper Rideau Lake – through their many years of service on the lake association, and afterwards, as strong supporters.

Bobs Lake Dam at Bolingbroke. Work Ongoing

Rideau Canal National Historic Site

November 14, 2018 – Work on phase one of the replacement of Bobs Lake Dam is progressing and will be ongoing until February 2019. This phase of work includes the construction of approximately two-thirds of the dam structure. The final phase of work will begin in summer 2019 and is expected to be completed in fall 2019.
The contractor has finished the excavation of the bedrock beneath the new dam site. They are now grouting the bedrock foundation to prepare the site for the construction of the new dam structure. The placement of concrete to build the new dam will begin in mid- November.

F6A7E1BC-E331-4A67-ACD1-F082AAC02248
In late February 2019, the contractor will take a brief break from construction to follow in-water work restrictions to protect fish during their spawning seasons. Once the restrictions have been lifted in July, the contractor will return to work to finish the construction of the dam.

The replacement of the Bobs Lake Dam is part of Parks Canada’s unprecedented $3 billion dollar investment over 5 years to support infrastructure work to heritage, visitor, waterway and highway assets located within national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas across Canada. These historic investments will mitigate health and safety risks, halt the loss of nationally significant built heritage and stimulate the economy in communities across the country.

About Bobs Lake Dam at Bolingbroke

Dams have existed on Bobs Lake at Bolingbroke since at least 1821. In 1870 the dam site was purchased by the Government of Canada in order to enhance the size of the reservoir for the Northern Sector of the Rideau Canal. In 1871 the dam was significantly increased in size and the volume of water in Bobs Lake was raised considerably. The current dam has been in place since 1930 and has seen several major repairs over the course of its operation.

For up-to-date news on infrastructure work along the Rideau Canal, please visit our website: www.parkscanada.gc.ca/rcInfrastructure.

LEAVING A COTTAGE TO YOUR CHILDREN

The wish of most cottagers is to pass on their cottage to the next generation. Most are keenly aware of how special and valuable the cottage experience is, and of how difficult it will be for their children to be able to find and afford a cottage of their own. However, most are not aware of how many obstacles must be overcome to ensure a realistic chance of keeping the cottage in the family.

Some of these obstacles include:

  • Because of changes to the Income Tax Act, many cottages will have to be sold by executors upon the death of the parents simply to pay decades of accumulated capital gains tax liability .
  • A child’s separation or divorce may result in the cottage being sold to satisfy the financial demands of the divorcing in-law.
  • A health crisis such as a stroke or Alzheimer’s Disease causing mental incapacity may result in the government forcing a sale of the cottage.
  • Differences between the children’s incomes and expectations may cause such family friction that the cottage is sold by the children themselves within a few years of inheriting.

Get the answers HERE

Birth of Upper Rideau Lake

The highest elevation in the Rideau Canal system occurs at Rideau Lake. From there, the Rideau River flows towards Bytown while the Cataraqui River receives its water from lakes and streams that flow towards Kingston. At first, Lieutenant-Colonel John By saw the large lake as a natural reservoir that could be easily tapped at each end, but when labour costs on a nearby stretch of canal began to spiral out of control, he had to look for a way to save time and money. His radical solution was to divide the big lake in two.

A decade after this channel was completed, Thomas Burrowes painted a scene that barely hints of the misery this stretch of canal inflicted on its builders. The banks of the waterway are littered with the rubble that had been removed by pick axe and blasting powder by hundreds of men who were trying to artificially connect two major riversheds.

 

Narrows Lock cut historicalRocky cut at the Isthmus,to join Rideau Lake and the Waters falling into Lake Ontario, looking South, 1841
Watercolour
Thomas Burrowes fonds
Reference Code: C 1-0-0-0-37
Archives of Ontario, I0002156